The Doctor's Art

Henry Bair and Tyler Johnson

The practice of medicine–filled with moments of joy, suffering, grace, sorrow, and hope–offers a window into the human condition. Though serving as guides and companions to patients’ illness experiences is profoundly meaningful work, the busy nature of modern medicine can blind its own practitioners to the reasons they entered it in the first place. Join oncologist Tyler Johnson and resident physician Henry Bair as they meet with doctors, patients, leaders, educators, and others in healthcare, to explore stories on finding and nourishing meaning in medicine. This podcast is for anyone striving for a deeper connection with their medical journey. Visit TheDoctorsArt.com for more information.

  • 1 hour 6 minutes
    Evolution, Human Nature, and Our Purpose in Life | Samuel Wilkinson, MD

    Conventionally, we are taught that evolution implies there is no ultimate purpose to our existence, that life lacks inherent meaning — we are the product of countless intricate molecular and genetic accidents. And to many, evolution leaves little room for, and perhaps even contradicts, the existence of a deity. 

    However, our guest on this episode, Samuel Wilkinson, MD, a professor of psychiatry at Yale University, thinks there is another way to look at evolution. Drawing from an array of disciplines ranging from evolutionary biology to cognitive science, Dr. Wilkinson provides a framework for evolution suggesting not only that there is an overarching purpose to our existence, but what that purpose is. He presents this framework in his 2024 book, Purpose: What Evolution and Human Nature Imply about the Meaning of Our Existence

    Over the course of our conversation, Dr. Wilkinson shares how an existential crisis during medical school led him down the path of exploring the ways evolution can be reconciled with fundamental questions and answers about life's meaning; how navigating the dual potential of human nature — pulling us between selfishness and altruism, aggression and cooperation — is key to understanding our purpose; why evolution does not exclude the possibility of existence of a god or gods; the importance of relationships in living fulfilling lives; the role of free will in the choice between good and evil; and more. 

    In this episode, you’ll hear about: 

    3:37 - How a drive to understand human nature drove Dr. Wilkinson to leave his engineering studies and pursue a career as a psychiatrist. 

    4:44 - The scope of Dr. Wilkinson’s work at Yale 

    7:13 - What studying depression has taught Dr. Wilkinson about human nature 

    9:00 - How Dr. Wilkinson views the connection between evolution and God 

    24:00 - How the central argument of Dr. Wilkinson’s book differs from intelligent design

    26:41 - Dr. Wilkinson’s view of selfishness in human nature 

    37:49 - The deeper meaning that Dr. Wilkinson sees within the biological patterns of evolution 

    39:04 - The validity of moral relativism

    43:42 - “The Rider and the Elephant” as a metaphor for human nature 

    45:43 - Dr. Wilkinson’s thoughts on free will 

    55:15 - How marriage can provide a cornerstone to building “a good life” 

    58:10 - The way in which Dr. Wilkinson’s faith fits into his personal view of human nature 

    1:04:42 - How Dr. Wilkinson brings these principles into his clinical practice 

    Dr. Samuel Wilkinson is the author of Purpose: What Evolution and Human Nature Imply about the Meaning of Our Existence (2024). 

    Works and Individuals Discussed:

    The Selfish Gene by Richard Dawkins

    Determined: A Science of Life Without Free Will by Robert Sapolsky

    Michael Behe and the concept of intelligent design 

    Free Will by Sam Harris

    11 June 2024, 11:00 am
  • 53 minutes 32 seconds
    Cancer as a Family Affair | Mark Lewis, MD

    For Mark Lewis, MD, cancer has defined his entire life. Growing up, he witnessed his father's valiant struggle with cancer before it eventually ended his life. While still in medical training, he not only developed pancreatic cancer but also discovered the culprit. Multiple endocrine neoplasia type 1, an inherited syndrome that drastically increases one's risk of cancers, runs in his family. So now, as a father, he guides his son in making sense of a life burdened with that risk. What’s more, as an oncologist, Dr. Lewis has also dedicated his professional life to understanding and treating cancers of the gastrointestinal system. 


    In this deeply personal conversation filled with pathos, wisdom, and hope, Dr. Lewis shares how he learned to cope with the rage he felt towards cancer in his early years, the solace he finds in religion and how he tactfully approaches matters of spirituality with his patients, how he was fundamentally transformed after undergoing the daunting Whipple surgical procedure, the wonder he feels when considering the remarkable progress science has made in cancer therapies, and how he channels his personal experiences to connect with patients. 


    This is an episode that paints a portrait of grace, resilience, and courage in the face of suffering and loss, and it reminds us to search for the dignity that is inherent in the act of caring for another person.


    In this episode, you’ll hear about: 


    2:43 - How watching his father deal with cancer led Dr. Lewis to a career in medicine.


    7:04 - How Dr. Lewis managed the grief and rage that came with his father’s passing. 


    11:10 - How the speed of medical innovation drives Dr. Lewis’ optimism. 


    19:51 - The role that faith plays in Dr. Lewis’ work and in his relationships with patients.


    29:07 - Dr. Lewis’ experience as a cancer patient and how it has informed his work as an oncologist. 


    39:21 - The ethical challenges involved in administering toxic treatments in oncology. 


    42:24 - The deeper meaning that Dr. Lewis has found through his experiences at the intersection of science and faith. 


    48:57 - Dr. Lewis’ advice for empathizing and connecting with patients. 


    Dr. Mark Lewis can be found on Twitter/X at @marklewismd.



    Visit our website www.TheDoctorsArt.com where you can find transcripts of all episodes.

    If you enjoyed this episode, please subscribe, rate, and review our show, available for free on Spotify, Apple Podcasts, or wherever you get your podcasts. If you know of a doctor, patient, or anyone working in health care who would love to explore meaning in medicine with us on the show, feel free to leave a suggestion in the comments or send an email to [email protected].



    Copyright The Doctor’s Art Podcast 2024




    4 June 2024, 11:00 am
  • 49 minutes 27 seconds
    A Life in Medical Innovation and Philanthropy | Sue Desmond-Hellmann, MD, MPH

    The Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation, with an endowment of over $50 billion, is one of the largest and most influential philanthropic organizations in the world. With a focus on addressing global health, poverty, and education, its initiatives have led to the reduction of malaria mortality by 60% over the past two decades, the near eradication of polio, increased educational opportunities of millions of students, and improved sanitation conditions for millions of people in developing countries. 


    For six years, oncologist Sue Desmond-Hellmann, MD, MPH was the CEO of this organization. Prior to that, she served as Chancellor of the University of California at San Francisco, as well as President of Product Development at Genentech, where she oversaw the development of Herceptin, Avastin, Rituxan, and other blockbuster cancer drugs that are now staples in the arsenal of many medical oncologists.


    The topics of our discussion in this episode are as varied as Dr. Desmond-Hellman's career. We discuss, among other things, how seeing the work of her pharmacist father encouraged her to pursue a career in medicine, how her early experiences treating HIV patients in Uganda spurred her to tackle global health challenges, how she discovered a passion for product development in the pharmaceutical industry, how she reconciles the ethical quandaries of developing medications that can cause serious adverse effects and that can sometimes cost hundreds of thousands of dollars per dose, what her mission while at the Gates Foundation was, and her perspectives on the role of artificial intelligence and human health and well-being, now that she has joined the board of directors of OpenAI, the company behind ChatGPT.


    In this episode, you will hear about: 


    2:50 - How working in her father’s pharmacy led Dr. Desmond-Hellmann to a career in medicine


    4:56 - A brief summary of Dr. Desmond-Hellmann’s multifaceted career trajectory


    15:36 - What the day to day work of pharmaceutical drug development looks like 


    18:30 - The challenging ethical concerns that surround drug approvals especially as it pertains to safety concerns


    23:44 - Dr. Desmond-Hellmann’s experiences in Uganda that forever transformed her views on poverty 


    27:55 - The aims of the Gates Foundation 


    30:47 - How Dr. Desmond-Hellmann views her work both in the non-profit and the for-profit sectors 


    37:15 - Dr. Desmond-Hellmann’s mission when she took on a leading role at The Gates Foundation 


    38:38 - How Dr. Desmond-Hellmann thinks about shaping the future of AI as she takes a seat on the board of OpenAI


    45:14 - Dr. Desmond-Hellmann’s advice for medical trainees and clinicians on how to navigate the many opportunities available to them along their career path


    Dr. Sue Desmond-Hellmann can be found on Twitter/X @suedhellmann.


    Visit our website www.TheDoctorsArt.com where you can find transcripts of all episodes.

    If you enjoyed this episode, please subscribe, rate, and review our show, available for free on Spotify, Apple Podcasts, or wherever you get your podcasts. If you know of a doctor, patient, or anyone working in health care who would love to explore meaning in medicine with us on the show, feel free to leave a suggestion in the comments or send an email to [email protected].

    Copyright The Doctor’s Art Podcast 2024

    28 May 2024, 11:00 am
  • 49 minutes 27 seconds
    Fostering Moral Leadership | Ira Bedzow, PhD

    In today's world, the idea of “identifying your values” is so ubiquitous, appearing from corporate mission statements to self-help books, that it can seem trivialized to the point of meaninglessness. But in this episode, Ira Bedzow, PhD reminds us it does not have to be this way—explorations of personal values can be an inspiring, holistic, and thought provoking process that transforms everything that we do, from finding joy in work to building fulfilling relationships. 


    Bedzow is the executive director of the Emory Purpose Project, an initiative at Emory University that provides opportunities for students to develop a capacity for reflection on purpose and meaning. He is also an associate professor in the Department of Medicine, a core faculty member of Emory's Center for Ethics, a senior fellow in Emory's Center for the Study of Law and Religion, and an Orthodox rabbi. 


    Over the course of our conversation, Bedzow discusses how he helps people discover their life purpose, how he teaches moral leadership, how he wrestles with questions of moral relativism, the connection between a loss of purpose and burnout, how he counsels clinicians on resolving ethical quandaries, and more.


    In this episode, you will hear about: 


    2:21 - The varied roles that make up Dr. Bedzow’s current career


    8:06 - What “values” mean


    15:53 - The principles Dr. Bedzow employs when counseling students on their career and life aspirations


    19:07 - Applying ethical thinking to medical scenarios 


    27:36 - How Dr. Bedzow counsels leadership at an organizational level


    31:02 - The connection between a loss of sense of purpose and burnout


     39:01 - How organizations and individuals can proactively foster a sense of mission 


    42:05 - The deep meaning that Dr. Bedzow finds in his religion 


    45:23 - Truths that Judaism can offer the world  



    Ira Bedzow is the author of the essay How Purpose and Employee Empowerment Can Stop Burnout.


    Ira Bedzow can be found on Twitter/X at @ijbedzow.


    Visit our website www.TheDoctorsArt.com where you can find transcripts of all episodes.

    If you enjoyed this episode, please subscribe, rate, and review our show, available for free on Spotify, Apple Podcasts, or wherever you get your podcasts. If you know of a doctor, patient, or anyone working in health care who would love to explore meaning in medicine with us on the show, feel free to leave a suggestion in the comments or send an email to [email protected].



    Copyright The Doctor’s Art Podcast 2024


    21 May 2024, 1:00 pm
  • 50 minutes 18 seconds
    Terminal Lucidity at the Edge of Life and Death | Alexander Batthyány, PhD

    Terminal lucidity is a mysterious yet well-documented phenomenon in which someone at the end of life—including those who have suffered strokes or other brain injuries, or those afflicted by dementia—suddenly returns with mental clarity and is able to recognize loved ones and engage in meaningful and emotionally rich conversations. It challenges our fundamental understanding and assumptions about the nature of consciousness, brain function in the context of severe illness, and personhood. 


    In this episode, Alexander Batthyány, PhD, a cognitive scientist and the Director of the Viktor Frankl Institute, offers insights on terminal lucidity from his years of study on this phenomenon from a philosophical, ethical, neurological, and psychological perspective. He is the author of the 2023 book Threshold: Terminal Lucidity and the Border of Life and Death.


    Over the course of our conversation, he shares how witnessing terminal lucidity in his grandmother has shaped his life purpose, why he chooses to use the word “soul” in his academic research, the role of spirituality and religion in making sense of terminal lucidity, the limits of our scientific and materialistic understanding of the brain, what terminal lucidity reveals about the dignity and unpredictability inherent in the human condition, and what it ultimately teaches us about kindness and compassion. 


    In this episode, you’ll hear about: 


    2:31 - The personal experience that drew Dr. Batthyány to study terminal lucidity 


    6:34 - An exploration of human dignity


    12:26 - The importance of talking and thinking about the human “soul”


    18:26 - Definition and phenomenology of terminal lucidity


    23:57 - What is known about brain functioning during episodes of terminal lucidity 


    31:44 - Advice for caregivers, family members, and clinicians if a patient experiences terminal lucidity


    36:55 - The prevalence of terminal lucidity 


    40:14 - Whether individuals who experience terminal lucidity have insight into their condition


    42:15 - Why phenomena like terminal lucidity matter



    Dr. Alexander Batthyány is the author of Threshold: Terminal Lucidity and the Border of Life and Death (2023).


    Dr. Batthyány can be found in Twitter/X at @Alxdr_Batthyany.


     

    Visit our website www.TheDoctorsArt.com where you can find transcripts of all episodes.

    If you enjoyed this episode, please subscribe, rate, and review our show, available for free on Spotify, Apple Podcasts, or wherever you get your podcasts. If you know of a doctor, patient, or anyone working in health care who would love to explore meaning in medicine with us on the show, feel free to leave a suggestion in the comments or send an email to [email protected].



    Copyright The Doctor’s Art Podcast 2024

    14 May 2024, 8:00 am
  • 54 minutes 3 seconds
    Leading the Leaders of Medical Education | David Skorton, MD

    The Association of American Medical Colleges (AAMC) plays a crucial role in health care. As the organization that oversees medical education and thus the pipeline of future medical professionals in the United States, its critical duties include administering the Medical College Admission Test (MCAT), managing the residency application service, drafting guidelines for faculty members and departments at medical schools and academic hospitals, disseminating data on medical education and workforce trends that shape policymaking at medical schools and government bodies, and promoting diversity in health care.


    Leading this organization is David Skorton, MD, a cardiologist and pioneer of cardiac imaging and computer processing techniques, who also previously served as the 13th Secretary of the Smithsonian Institution and as President of Cornell University and of the University of Iowa. In this episode, Dr. Skorton shares with us how his family's immigrant past has shaped him, how he went from struggling during his own medical school application process more than 50 years ago to now leading an organization that represents all medical schools and teaching hospitals, why the arts and humanities matter to him, how he thinks about medical education given the emergence of generative artificial intelligence, what great mentors look like, how effective leadership often means learning from everyone around you, and more.


    In this episode, you will hear about: 


    2:42 - Dr. Skorton’s unexpected path from jazz musician to President of the AAMC


    7:42 - Why current medical admissions aim to be “holistic”


    12:09 - The lessons Dr. Skorton learned through mentorship and why the arts and humanities can create better doctors


    17:32 - How Dr. Skorton has been able to “see past himself” enough to receive challenging criticism from mentors


    28:01 - The core tenets of Dr. Skorton’s leadership philosophy 


    31:35 - How the AAMC views the future of medical education especially in light of advances in artificial intelligence


    38:47 - The importance of diverse healthcare teams


    46:32 - Issues that Dr. Skorton addresses through his role at the AAMC




    Dr. David Skorton can be found on Twitter/X at @DavidJSkorton.


    Visit our website www.TheDoctorsArt.com where you can find transcripts of all episodes.

    If you enjoyed this episode, please subscribe, rate, and review our show, available for free on Spotify, Apple Podcasts, or wherever you get your podcasts. If you know of a doctor, patient, or anyone working in health care who would love to explore meaning in medicine with us on the show, feel free to leave a suggestion in the comments or send an email to [email protected].



    Copyright The Doctor’s Art Podcast 2024



    7 May 2024, 8:00 am
  • 57 minutes 32 seconds
    The Sky Was Falling — Stories from a COVID Diary | Cornelia Griggs, MD

    In spring of 2020, Cornelia Griggs, MD was finishing her nearly decade-long training to become a pediatric surgeon in New York City, when COVID-19 struck and life fell apart. The hospital was flooded with mysteriously sick patients for whom no known treatments existed, basic supplies disappeared from shelves, and each day at work took on an existential burden as she wondered if this would be the day she caught the deadly disease herself. 


    Dr. Griggs describes these dramatic stories from the early days of the pandemic in her 2024 memoir, The Sky Was Falling. Today, she is a triple board-certified pediatric surgeon, having completed medical school and pediatric surgery fellowship at Columbia University Medical Center, and her adult general surgery residency and surgical critical care fellowship at Massachusetts General Hospital, where she currently practices. 


    Over the course of our conversation, Dr. Griggs describes the course of her challenging training in medicine, why it takes “a little crazy” to succeed as a surgeon, harrowing moments that defined heroism amid the throes of the pandemic, how she continued working even when giving up was the easy option, and more.


    In this episode, you’ll hear about: 


    2:26 - What initially drew Dr. Griggs into the field of medicine and to the speciality of pediatric surgery 


    14:35 - Why the operating room is a “safe space” for Dr. Griggs


    19:36 - The sense of alarm that Dr. Griggs experienced in the early days of the pandemic that drove her to write her viral New York Times op-ed, The Sky is Falling 


    28:26 - How Dr. Griggs fell into an “investigative reporter” headspace as the pandemic raged around her in New York City 


    30:26 - The sense of fear that enveloped both patients and the medical community during the first months of the pandemic 


    40:27 - A moment during the early pandemic when Dr. Griggs seriously considered leaving the city and her post in the hospital


    46:30 - How ICU nurses brought dignity and humanity when tending to seriously ill COVID-19 patients


    51:16 - The hopefulness Dr. Griggs carries in seeing the large number of people who have entered medicine since the pandemic



    Dr. Cornelia Griggs can be found on Twitter/X at @CorneliaLG.


    Dr. Griggs is the author ofThe Sky Was Falling (2024).


    Visit our website www.TheDoctorsArt.com where you can find transcripts of all episodes.

    If you enjoyed this episode, please subscribe, rate, and review our show, available for free on Spotify, Apple Podcasts, or wherever you get your podcasts. If you know of a doctor, patient, or anyone working in health care who would love to explore meaning in medicine with us on the show, feel free to leave a suggestion in the comments or send an email to [email protected].



    Copyright The Doctor’s Art Podcast 2024

    30 April 2024, 1:00 pm
  • 54 minutes 25 seconds
    Rethinking Health in an Aging Society | Linda Fried, MD, MPH

    To many health economists, the growing aging population is the greatest public health challenge facing America. The current fragmented and costly healthcare system is simply incapable of dealing with the complex medical and socioeconomic needs of this population, especially in an equitable way.


    Our guest on this episode, Linda Fried, MD, MPH, has dedicated her life to rethinking how we can create better health futures for older adults. Her pioneering research has expanded our notions of aging and longevity in the 21st century. Dr. Fried, a geriatrician and epidemiologist, is Dean of the Columbia University Mailman School of Public Health, Senior Vice President of the Columbia University Irving Medical Center, and former Founding Director of the Center on Aging and Health at Johns Hopkins University. 


    Over the course of our conversation, Dr. Fried shares how her early experiences as a caseworker drove her to study medicine, surprising lessons from the martial arts aikido, what frailty means in the context of caring for older adults, why America is one of the most age segregated societies in the world, the flaws of over medicalizing health issues, redefining the roles of older adults in society, the importance of meaning and community in sustaining happiness in life, and more.


    In this episode, you’ll hear about: 


    2:30 - What Dr. Fried’s early experiences in social work taught her about justice, social inequity, and taking care of another person


    11:47 - How an awareness of the social determinants of health shaped Dr. Fried as a clinician 


    16:46 - Why physicians need to stop “medicalizing” all aspects of a patient’s life


    25:00 - How Dr. Fried came to be interested in geriatrics 


    28:19 - Dr. Fried’s dedication to extending “healthspan” as well as “lifespan” in our society 


    31:08 - The clinical definition of “frailty”


    34:15 - The value that an older population could bring to our society


    38:49 - The United States’ unique culture of age segregation and how it contributes to poor health outcomes for the elderly


    45:38 - What the healthcare system and society at large can do to better serve elderly populations 


    50:55 - Dr. Fried’s advice for keeping true to your purpose as a medical professional 


    Dr. Linda Fried can be found on LinkedIn.

    Visit our website www.TheDoctorsArt.com where you can find transcripts of all episodes.

    If you enjoyed this episode, please subscribe, rate, and review our show, available for free on Spotify, Apple Podcasts, or wherever you get your podcasts. If you know of a doctor, patient, or anyone working in health care who would love to explore meaning in medicine with us on the show, feel free to leave a suggestion in the comments or send an email to [email protected].



    Copyright The Doctor’s Art Podcast 2024

    23 April 2024, 11:00 am
  • 48 minutes 4 seconds
    Tales from the Wild West of Cardiac Surgery | Gerald Imber, MD

    The history of cardiac surgery is filled with tales of intrepid surgeons with larger-than-life personalities who pushed the limits of the human body and the bounds of what were then considered acceptable medical practices. The result? Heart transplants, pacemakers, artificial heart valves, heart-lung machines, and other once-unthinkable and experimental procedures that have now saved millions of lives. 

    Our guest in this episode, Gerald Imber, MD, charts these remarkable developments in his 2024 book Cardiac Cowboys: The Heroic Invention of Heart Surgery. While not writing books on the history of medicine, Dr. Imber is a practicing plastic surgeon who specializes in cosmetic surgery. Over the course of our conversation, Dr. Imber talks about the challenging yet rewarding training he underwent as a surgery resident, what it means to have an “eye for aesthetics,” why he decided to write a book on the history of heart surgery, stories of daring surgeons from this history, how he reconciles the drive to push the frontiers of medicine with a regard for patient safety, and more.


    In this episode, you’ll hear about:


    2:15 - What drew Dr. Imber to a career in surgery 

    7:55 - Dr. Imber’s grueling experiences as a general surgery resident

    11:52 - Dr. Imber’s transition into plastic surgery and the aesthetic sensibilities necessary for this speciality 

    22:46 - What Dr. Imber’s current plastic surgery practice looks like 

    24:28 - How Dr. Imber finds fulfillment and meaning in his work 

    25:21 - What motivated Dr. Imber to write Cardiac Cowboys, a book about the history of open heart surgery 

    30:47 - Balancing risks to patient lives with medical and surgical experimentation

    34:25 - A brief history of open heart surgery

    40:02 - Key milestones in the development of open heart surgery 

    45:24 - What Dr. Imber hopes readers take away from Cardiac Cowboys 


    Dr. Gerald Imber is the author of Cardiac Cowboys: The Heroic Invention of Heart Surgery (2024) and Genius on the Edge: The Bizarre Double Life of Dr. William Stewart Halsted (2010).

    Dr. Imber can be found on Instagram at @geraldimbermd.

    Visit our website www.TheDoctorsArt.com where you can find transcripts of all episodes.

    If you enjoyed this episode, please subscribe, rate, and review our show, available for free on Spotify, Apple Podcasts, or wherever you get your podcasts. If you know of a doctor, patient, or anyone working in health care who would love to explore meaning in medicine with us on the show, feel free to leave a suggestion in the comments or send an email to [email protected].

    Copyright The Doctor’s Art Podcast 2024

    16 April 2024, 8:00 am
  • 57 minutes 7 seconds
    To Create a Vaccine | Paul Offit, MD

    Rotavirus, a highly contagious virus that causes severe diarrhea and vomiting, used to kill more than half a million children annually. But the introduction of the rotavirus vaccine has slashed that number dramatically, saving hundreds of thousands of lives each year. 


    Joining us in this episode is Paul Offit, MD, a co-inventor of one of the two most widely used rotavirus vaccines worldwide. Dr. Offit is a professor of pediatrics and vaccinology at the University of Pennsylvania and director of the Vaccine Education Center at the Children's Hospital of Philadelphia. A leading world expert on vaccines, he served on the FDA Vaccine Advisory Committee during the COVID-19 pandemic. He is the author of more than 15 books, most recently Tell Me When It's Over: An Insider's Guide to Deciphering Covid Myths and Navigating our Post-Pandemic World (2024). 


    Over the course of our conversation, Dr. Offit shares what drew him to pediatrics, how he developed a vaccine that now saves hundreds of kids every day, the stringent process by which new medications are approved, the origins of vaccine hesitancy. Why public health communication failed during the COVID-19 pandemic, what we can do to restore public trust in medicine, and more.


    In this episode, you’ll hear about: 


    2:24 - The harrowing experience Dr. Offit endured as a young child that inspired him to a seek a career in pediatrics


    6:40 - How Dr. Offit’s research led to a successful rotavirus vaccine in 2006 


    10:46 - A brief history of vaccines


    16:40 - Why Dr. Offit chose to become a public advocate for vaccines 


    20:14 - Why vaccines have garnered such intense backlash from large proportions of the public 


    26:44 - Factors that have led to an erosion of trust in public health over the past four years


    33:01 - What Dr. Offit means when he talks about “following the science”


    40:35 - How public health officials can speak about scientific knowledge in a way that acknowledges uncertainty


    47:37 - The future of vaccines mandates in our society 


    54:16 - Dr. Offit’s advice for building trust with skeptical parents 



    Dr. Paul Offit is the author of 13 books, including Tell Me When It's Over: An Insider's Guide to Deciphering Covid Myths and Navigating our Post-Pandemic World (2024).


    Dr. Offit can be found on Twitter/X at @DrPaulOffit.



    Visit our website www.TheDoctorsArt.com where you can find transcripts of all episodes.

    If you enjoyed this episode, please subscribe, rate, and review our show, available for free on Spotify, Apple Podcasts, or wherever you get your podcasts. If you know of a doctor, patient, or anyone working in health care who would love to explore meaning in medicine with us on the show, feel free to leave a suggestion in the comments or send an email to [email protected].



    Copyright The Doctor’s Art Podcast 2024


    9 April 2024, 8:00 am
  • 56 minutes 10 seconds
    A Moral Drive to Heal the World | Jim Yong Kim, MD, PhD

    Soon after finishing his first semester of college, Jim Yong Kim, MD, PhD excitedly told his father that he'd dedicate his life to starting a social justice movement. In response, his father sternly reprimanded him, saying that the only career he'd support was one in medicine. Dr. Kim acquiesced, but over the subsequent decades would hold on to this passion for social justice and become one of the most influential individuals working in global health, poverty reduction, and sustainable development. 


    He co-founded Partners in Health, today a renowned medical humanitarian organization that operates in the poorest areas of developing countries. From there, he served as advisor to the Director-General of the World Health Organization and as Director of its HIV/Aids Department. He would then serve as the 17th President of Dartmouth College, before being selected as President of the World Bank, a position he would hold for seven years. 


    In this episode, Dr. Kim joins us to discuss his unique training combining medicine with anthropology, the cultural factors that shaped his understanding of international development, how he spearheaded radical efforts to treat millions of HIV and multidrug-resistant tuberculosis patients around the world, the inner mechanisms of the World Bank, the moral philosophy that drives his work, and more.



    In this episode, we discuss: 



    2:32 - Dr Kim’s motivation for pursuing both medicine and anthropology 


    8:04 - How Dr. Kim paired his clinical training with his passion for social justice 


    16:46 - How Dr. Kim stayed true to his moral convictions as he faced challenges in managing global crises such as the HIV epidemic in Africa 


    26:29 - The story of PEPFAR, one of the most ambitious initiatives to address the global HIV/AIDS pandemic pandemic


    30:45 - How committing to moral justice can help people think outside of the box to meet the economic needs of a situation 


    33:36 - The history and goals of the World Bank 


    38:11 - How Dr. Kim prepared for his role at the World Bank, an organization that operates in many sectors in addition to global health 


    43:28 - How Dr. Kim maintains a sense of purpose and fulfillment throughout his career



    Dr. Jim Yong Kim can be found on Twitter/X at @jim_yong12.

    Visit our website www.TheDoctorsArt.com where you can find transcripts of all episodes.

    If you enjoyed this episode, please subscribe, rate, and review our show, available for free on Spotify, Apple Podcasts, or wherever you get your podcasts. If you know of a doctor, patient, or anyone working in health care who would love to explore meaning in medicine with us on the show, feel free to leave a suggestion in the comments or send an email to [email protected].



    Copyright The Doctor’s Art Podcast 2024



    2 April 2024, 8:00 am
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