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Schwartz Media

A daily news show from the publisher of The Monthly and The Saturday Paper.

  • 20 minutes 10 seconds
    The executive, the mine and the corruption referral

    On a remote island in the Gulf of Carpentaria, there are two towns.

    One is home to a thriving economy. It has a golf course, cinema and tennis courts. It’s the richest postcode in the Northern Territory. Most of the people who live there are white.

    The other is home to the Anindilyakwa people - the Traditional Owners. The locals live just a few hundred metres from the world’s largest manganese mine. Here, life outcomes are worse than anywhere else in the country. 

    This jarring contrast raises questions about where the royalties of this mine are flowing – and why the Traditional Owners are seeing so little return to their community.

    Now, the National Indigenous Australians Agency has referred the white chief executive of the Anindilyakwa Land Council to the National Anti-Corruption Commission over his plan to take a personal 10 per cent stake in a mining project on the island.

    Today, Gunaikurnai and Wotjobaluk writer Ben Abbatangelo on the plan and the man who stood in its way.


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    Guest: Gunaikurnai and Wotjobaluk writer Ben Abbatangelo

    23 July 2024, 7:00 pm
  • 19 minutes 47 seconds
    Why Biden pulled out: 'Money is the mother's milk of politics'

    With just over a hundred days to go until the US election, Joe Biden has announced he’s dropping out of the presidential race.

    In a letter posted to X, he said “I believe it is in the best interest of my party and the country for me to stand down and focus solely on fulfilling my duties as President for the remainder of my term”.

    His decision comes after weeks of pressure from donors and colleagues to drop out.

    The question now is whether the Democrats will unite behind Vice President Kamala Harris, who President Biden has endorsed to succeed him. 

    Today, senior fellow at the United States Studies Centre Bruce Wolpe on the key players who pushed Biden out and whether Kamala Harris can defeat Donald Trump.


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    Guest: Senior fellow at the United States Studies Centre Bruce Wolpe

    22 July 2024, 7:00 pm
  • 20 minutes 10 seconds
    The truth about men who kill women

    News stories about violence against women have been coming hard and fast these past few weeks. 

    These stories of the women — and sometimes children — killed, usually by a man they knew and often in a terribly violent way, are hard to read. 

    Yet years of education campaigns and talk of respect for women seem to have made no difference, and every few days, another woman dies.

    Today, Australia’s Sex Discrimination Commissioner Dr Anna Cody on why men kill women, and why Australia’s domestic violence problem is still getting worse. 


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    Guest: Australia’s Sex Discrimination Commissioner, Dr Anna Cody

    21 July 2024, 7:00 pm
  • 29 minutes 25 seconds
    Read This: David Marr vs Australia’s Old Lie

    For many Australians, facing the reality of this country is a task that has proved enduringly difficult, both at a public and a political level. For investigative journalist David Marr, finding the right way to tell the stories that allow us to see the truth of our history is a personal quest and one that has led to his latest book. In this episode of our sister podcast, Read This, Michael talks with David about shame – both personal and national – and why his family agreed that he had to write Killing for Country.

    20 July 2024, 7:00 pm
  • 22 minutes 44 seconds
    Who knew the CFMEU's dirty secrets?

    This week, allegations of corruption, criminal infiltration, standover tactics and other nefarious activities within the ranks of the CFMEU have been all over the media. 

    The reports have shocked, but not surprised, many in the community.

    Stories of underworld figures trading their leather for high viz, motorcycle helmets for hardhats – all in order, it is alleged, to get a slice of taxpayer-funded projects.

    Now there are questions over who knew what, when, and what it means for some of Australia’s largest infrastructure projects.

    Today, associate editor of The Saturday Paper Martin McKenzie-Murray on the fallout from the CFMEU upheaval.


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    Guest: Associate editor of The Saturday Paper, Martin Mckenzie-Murray.

    18 July 2024, 7:00 pm
  • 21 minutes 34 seconds
    How to be a climate whistleblower

    In the Pitjantjatjara communities of Anangu Country on the edge of the Nullarbor Plain, cancer rates are higher than elsewhere in Australia.

    This is the legacy of nuclear testing by the British government, which staged seven atomic explosions between 1956 and 1963, contaminating the land. 

    Thanks to nuclear engineer and whistleblower Alan Parkinson, we know that the cleanup, in his words, was more of a “cover up”, with cost-cutting measures putting communities at further risk.  

    As Australia stares down the barrel of a climate crisis, and with the climate wars back in the news – blowing the whistle on environmental harms is more important than ever. 

    Today, senior lawyer at the Human Rights Law Center and contributor to The Saturday Paper, Regina Featherstone, on how whistleblowers are an untapped resource in the pursuit of a safer climate.


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    Guest: Senior lawyer at the Human Rights Law Center and contributor to The Saturday Paper, Regina Featherstone.

    17 July 2024, 7:00 pm
  • 21 minutes 17 seconds
    The surge in financial abuse against women

    Shenane Hogg spent nine months in a coma after suffering abuse at the hands of her partner.

    During her recovery, she discovered her abuser had amassed $56,000 of debt in her name.

    Shenane’s story is just one of many that was heard at a parliamentary inquiry into how the financial system can be used to abuse women.

    The inquiry has heard chilling evidence of a sharp rise in financial abuse that can manifest as offensive and threatening messages in streams of bank transfers, raiding of a partner’s super benefits, or making them liable for joint debts.

    Today, chief political correspondent for The Saturday Paper Karen Barlow on the cost of financial abuse, and why we’re failing to prevent it.


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    Guest: Chief political correspondent for The Saturday Paper Karen Barlow.

    16 July 2024, 7:00 pm
  • 20 minutes 55 seconds
    Assassinations, insurrections and massacres: an American story

    The attempted assassination of former US president Donald Trump shocked America.

    Prominent public figures from all sides of the political spectrum have spoken out and condemned the use of violence, with President Joe Biden saying “it’s not who we are as a nation”.

    But is that true?

    And does this response downplay just how pervasive political violence has been in US history?

    Today, journalist and author of The Forever War: America’s Unending Conflict with Itself Nick Bryant on America’s long and sordid tradition of violence and dangerous rhetoric.


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    Guest: Journalist and author of The Forever War: America’s Unending Conflict with Itself Nick Bryant

    15 July 2024, 7:00 pm
  • 20 minutes 9 seconds
    Peter Dutton’s big Queensland energy

    In Queensland, one issue is already dominating the upcoming state election: youth crime.

    So when the Liberal National Party launched their campaign, Peter Dutton was the perfect man to help sell their pitch.

    The federal opposition leader and former Queensland cop has been stressing his closeness to his home state.

    Already Peter Dutton has promised to crack down on crime, slow immigration, break up supermarket monopolies, and shift the green energy focus to nuclear.

    So will the Queensland election be a testing ground for Dutton’s federal agenda?

    Today, special correspondent for The Saturday Paper Jason Koutsoukis on how Peter Dutton is marketing himself, and whether Australia is ready to look more like Queensland.


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    Guest: Special correspondent for The Saturday Paper, Jason Koutsoukis.

    14 July 2024, 7:00 pm
  • 30 minutes 37 seconds
    Read This: Leigh Sales Is a Professional Stickybeak

    Long before she was hosting 7:30 on the ABC, Leigh Sales dreamed of becoming a novelist. In this episode of our sister podcast, Read This, she joins Michael to discuss her secret desire to write fiction, the art of crafting a good story, and how being a journalist allowed her to become a professional stickybeak.

    13 July 2024, 7:00 pm
  • 24 minutes 25 seconds
    Artist and refugee Mostafa Azimitabar on painting from a hostile country

    When Mostafa Azimitabar was imprisoned on Manus Island, he was overcome with a desire to paint.

    With no art supplies, he used a toothbrush – a technique he continues with to this day.

    Mostafa survived the brutality of Australia’s asylum seeker detention system for more than eight years. Freed in 2021, he now lives in Sydney.

    His art has been shortlisted for the Archibald prize twice. But he paints from the edges of a country whose systems remain hostile towards him, as he navigates temporary visas with no stability, at constant risk of deportation.

    Today, artist and refugee Mostafa Azimitabar on how his work is a testimony to his suffering and the one thing authorities can never take from him.


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    Guest: Artist and refugee, Mostafa Azimitabar.

    11 July 2024, 7:00 pm
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