• Ophelia by Walter de la Mare

    Ophelia, poem of the week for February 25, 2007; read here by twelve of our readers. Ophelia loved Hamlet, was repulsed by him, and went insane. She drowned in a stream, gathering flowers of remembrance. This is one of a number of poems that de la Mare wrote about Shakespeare characters.

  • Historical Tales, Vol II: American II by ANDREWS, Charles McLean

    Volume II of a series containing anecdotes and stories, some well-known, others less so, of particular countries. This second volume supplements the first with additional stories of the discovery, colonization, founding, and early years of the United States of America, describing history for children and young adults in an exciting and novel manner. (Summary by Kalynda)

  • Author Spotlight with H.S. Clark

    H.S. Clark presents exclusive interviews with bestselling and emerging authors.

  • Anna Karenina, Book 7 by TOLSTOY, Leo

    Anna Karenina tells of the doomed love affair between the sensuous and rebellious Anna and the dashing officer, Count Vronsky. In Book 7, Levin, in town for Kitty’s confinement, finds himself drawn to the corruptive influence of Moscow society. Stiva again presses Karenin to divorce Anna, while Anna, driven by jealousy, becomes increasingly irrational towards Vronsky. (Summary by Mary Anderson and MaryAnn)

  • Andrew Mayne {books} » Grendel’s Shadow

    When an unknown animal starts killing off settlers on a backwater planet run on coal and steam power, there’s only person who can help stop the slaughter; T.R. Westwood. A distinguished professor of biology and the galaxy’s greatest hunter, he’s the man to go to when the local wildlife needs to be reminded who is the galaxy’s top predator.

  • Apology by PLATO (Πλάτων)

    The Apology of Socrates is Plato's version of the speech given by Socrates as he unsuccessfully defended himself in 399 BC against the charges of "corrupting the young, and by not believing in the gods in whom the city believes, but in other daimonia that are novel" (24b). "Apology" here has its earlier meaning (now usually expressed by the word "apologia") of speaking in defense of a cause or of one's beliefs or actions (from the Ancient Greek ἀπολογία). (Summary by Wikipedia)

  • Excellent Foppery

    The podcast that looks at books and literature through the eyes of slightly intoxicated teenagers.

  • Celibates by MOORE, George

    The author is considered the first great Irish writer of realist fiction and is said to have been an inspiration for James Joyce. Celibates is a novel of three characters: Mildred Lawson, John Norton and Agnes Lahens.They have nothing in common other than an absolute love of themselves and an inability to sympathize with others. In that vein, it constitutes a striking image of our own modern day self-absorbed society. (Introduction by James Carson)

  • Further Foolishness by LEACOCK, Stephen

    Seventeen goofy stories and essays by Canadian humourist Stephen Leacock. "Professor Leacock has made more people laugh with the written word than any other living author. One may say he is one of the greatest jesters, the greatest humorist of the age." – A. P. Herbert (Introduction by TriciaG & Wikipedia)

MOON.FM Apps

The easiest way to discover the best of over 600,000+ podcasts.

Enjoy the largest selection of free sports, music, talk & news radio from around the world.Find out what's new and what's hot.

Download Now